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Printed from https://shop.writing.com/main/books/entry_id/1057698-Nov-22-2023-Fantasy-Newsletter-Deadline-Mon-Nov-20-2023
Rated: 18+ · Book · Women's · #562186
Each snowflake, like each human being is unique.
#1057698 added December 16, 2023 at 5:02pm
Restrictions: None
Nov 22, 2023 Fantasy Newsletter Deadline: Mon Nov 20, 2023
Research

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B6tunn
https://www.britannica.com/topic/Niflheim
https://listverse.com/2018/11/18/10-evil-winter-dwelling-beasts-from-folklore/
https://www.deviantart.com/whisperthewolfie/journal/Top-10-Mythical-Creatures-of...
https://ulukayin.org/eight-mythological-winter-and-snow-creatures/
https://www.tribality.com/2016/12/21/6-wintery-mythological-creatures-that-arent...

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1. A Wicked Radiance
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9. What if?

Heading 1

Frost Giants and Other Winter Monsters

Heading 2

Do you use any winter myths or monsters in your stories or poems?

Hook

What are some of the winter myths or monsters from your culture?

About This Newsletter

It is still autumn, but winter has arrived in all its beauty and misery. Here in the western United States there will be an El Niño winter. Which, normally, means colder than normal. However, with climate change it could be much worse. This got me to thinking about what type of mythological creatures would be present in the snow and the cold.

Letter From the Editor

There are numerous mythological creatures that like winter weather. Many of these creatures are usually considered monsters because they are evil. However, that does not apply to all the mythological creatures. Some of them are good, which suggests that they are helpful. Other creatures of myth can be both good and evil depending on the circumstances.

Do frost giants and yeti
welcome winter weather?

Frost giants, also known as Jötunn, are from Norse mythology. If they are male, they are called risi, þurs, or trolls. If they are female, they are referred to as gýgr or tröllkona. These creatures can dwell any place from their own land of Jötunheimr to any other place in the known universe.

Yeti are classed as cryptids rather than myths. They normally dwell in the ice and snow of the Himalayan Mountains. They are about the size of a Sasquatch (a cryptid of the western United States) with white fur or hair. I suspect this helps them hide in the snow.

Beware the wolves of winter!

Wolves appear in a great many winter myths. Amaroq, in Inuit mythology, is a giant wolf that can be both dangerous and helpful. He is dangerous because he stalks and devours those who hunt at night. He is helpful because he keeps reindeer herds healthy by eating the weak and the sick. He is also known to befriend lost and lonely children.

Wolves are not the only creatures that can be good, evil, or both. There are creatures similar to Saint Nicholas and Krampus in almost all winter mythologies. Most of these myths can be traced back to pre-Christian origins.

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Imogen Elliott writes: The "headless horseman" Ichabod Crane is undoubtedly one of the most captivating folklore stories about Halloween, and it has always been one of my favorites.

sorry, buddhangela's broken writes: The October facts, folklore, and myths listed in this newsletter seem to be focused on the Northern Hemisphere, especially North America and Western Europe. Since WDC has quite a few members from other locations and other ethnicities, it might be nice to include them in newsletters like this one–especially since those of us in N. America and Europe are likely very familiar with most of the myths associated with Halloween/Samhain and are aware that the days are growing longer, the weather grows colder, the leaves change color, etc.

Perhaps next year this newsletter could explore what non-white cultures do during this time of year, and whether (and how) Halloween is celebrated in the Southern Hemisphere. Thanks for your consideration!


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Printed from https://shop.writing.com/main/books/entry_id/1057698-Nov-22-2023-Fantasy-Newsletter-Deadline-Mon-Nov-20-2023