*Magnify*
    May     ►
SMTWTFS
   
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Archive RSS
SPONSORED LINKS
Printed from https://shop.writing.com/main/books/entry_id/1066067-Apr-10-2024-Fantasy-Newsletter-Deadline-Mon-Apr-8-2024
Rated: 18+ · Book · Women's · #562186
Each snowflake, like each human being is unique.
<<< Previous · Entry List · Next >>>
#1066067 added April 10, 2024 at 2:56pm
Restrictions: None
Apr 10, 2024 Fantasy Newsletter Deadline Mon Apr 8, 2024
Research

Editor's Picks

1. The Truth About Thantia
2. Joe Lewis Meets the Grim Reaper
3. Worm Moon
4. Rain Boy
5. The Grass is Always Greener
6. Little Green Men
7. The Smiling Rabbit - The Untold Truth
8.
9.

Heading 1

Weather Spells and Climate Change

Heading 2

Could weather spells affect more than the local where they are cast?

Hook

Have you ever used a weather spell in one of your stories?

About This Newsletter

Rain, rain go away
Little (insert person's name here}
Wants to play!

That is a weather spell I learned as a child, and used several times when I wanted to go outside and play on a rainy day. I'm not sure how well it worked, because one of the intriguing things about the weather is that it can change suddenly, without giving any warning. However, the memory did get me to thinking about the weather spells used in fantasy stories and how they would affect the weather and even the climate beyond the location where they are cast.

Letter From the Editor

Due to technology, we know a lot more today about how human actions and natural occurrences (such as an erupting volcano) affects the weather and climate both locally and worldwide. Magic spells are common in fantasy stories, and supposedly affect only the location they are used in. Is this true of weather spells?

Could a weather spell, cast in a specific location inadvertently expand beyond that location. In the modern none magical world, humans can encourage it to rain by seeding the clouds. In fantasy stories rain can be caused by casting a rain spell, which is a help in a drought. The question is, could the effect of that spell move beyond the casting location and cause a flood? Think about it, and submit your answer to the fantasy newsletter.

A rain spell is not the only type of weather spell a magic user can cast. There are wind, snow, and temperature spells. Is it possible for these spells to affect the climate in a given area? If you think this scenario is possible, please write a short story and submit it to the fantasy newsletter.

Deadline for my next fantasy newsletter is May 3. Content rating 18+. Word count 2,000 words or less.

Editors Picks

 The Truth About Thantia  (18+)
Some Leaders were the same. They would do whatever it took to stay the leader.
#2315845 by PureSciFi


 Joe Lewis Meets the Grim Reaper By  (13+)
inspired by a nightmare
#2303308 by JCosmos


 Worm Moon  (E)
Sam needs some help. Writer's Cramp entry deadline 3/25/24. 977 words. Winning Entry
#2316785 by IE


STATIC
Rain Boy  (E)
A boy stands in the rain.
#2280179 by Beholden


 The Grass is Always Greener  (E)
Sci Fi Acrostic Poem based on a story - Things are not always better when we move on
#1870849 by Shawlyn


STATIC
Little Green Men  (E)
Meeting an alien
#881371 by W.D.Wilcox


 The Smiling Rabbit - The Untold Truth  (E)
A retelling of a known fable with a different perspective
#2317630 by J.R. PETE


Submitted by Readers

STATIC
The Tokoloshe  (18+)
A strange choice for a pet.
#2276929 by Beholden


Activities, Groups, and Contests



brom21 writes: Wow! What a sleuth of creature inspirations! I once came up with a half dog half dragon beast. It seems there is no end to what you can contrive. lol. This whole idea reminds me of the book called Creature Features. I Googled it and there are multiple books by that name apparently. Thanks for the fascinating creature info! Great NL!

Beholden writes: I don't recognise any of the African monsters you mention, but I can tell you that the word Grootslang is Afrikaans (the language of the original Dutch settlers of South Africa) and it means Big Snake.

There is a story that I've written that involves an African mythical monster called a tokoloshe. Here's a link to it:

STATIC
The Tokoloshe  (18+)
A strange choice for a pet.
#2276929 by Beholden


s writes: For my Horror Writing Contest, I recently had a prompt of Australian creatures. In my research on the topic, I have found more than 150 different and varied creatures and cryptids from legend, mythology and modern belief. Then the Pacific islands and New Zealand have their fair share as well. Because the civilisations have been recorded in the Northen hemisphere so much extensively, I think looking south of the Equator can lead to some fascinating and very unique creatures for writers of fantasy or horror.

writes:
writes:
writes:
writes:
writes:
writes:
writes:


© Copyright 2024 Prosperous Snow celebrating (UN: nfdarbe at Writing.Com). All rights reserved.
Prosperous Snow celebrating has granted Writing.Com, its affiliates and its syndicates non-exclusive rights to display this work.
<<< Previous · Entry List · Next >>>
Printed from https://shop.writing.com/main/books/entry_id/1066067-Apr-10-2024-Fantasy-Newsletter-Deadline-Mon-Apr-8-2024